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Police ask abuse victims to come forward

By ,  |  Friday, October 18, 2013 10:17 AM

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — St. Paul police on Thursday asked anyone who has been a victim of sexual abuse by a priest to come forward and report their experiences to law enforcement.

Police Cmdr. Mary Nash addressed potential victims directly during a news conference, saying: “We want to hear from you. We want to hear your story.”

“Whether you have come forward with your abuse or whether you are working to cross that threshold of disclosure, you are stronger than you know,” she said.

Nash made the plea as police continue to investigate allegations that a priest in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis may have had child pornography on his computer in 2004. Police had closed that case, after finding no evidence of illegal images, but reopened it earlier this month after receiving new information.

Nash declined to elaborate on the investigation or its scope, saying it is ongoing.

The archdiocese, in a statement, says it also encourages anyone who suspects sexual abuse of a minor or vulnerable adult to first contact law enforcement.

Last week, the archdiocese created an independent task force to examine the way church officials have handled accusations of sexual misconduct by priests.

This item was posted in Church Investigations, More News, News and has 1 comment so far.

1 Comment

  1. Michael Skiendzielewski
    Oct. 22, 2013 8:03 AM

    “….He (McDonough) told the archbishop and Eisenzimmer that he had spoken with a nun who had expressed concerns about Keating over the years.

    The “bottom line” to that conversation, McDonough wrote, was that she was certain Keating had never committed a sexual act with any underage girl before or after his ordination.

    “On the other hand, she expressed a great deal of concern about a longstanding pattern of behavior that she knows to have influenced several women, including herself,” McDonough wrote.

    “I proposed to her the phrase ‘inattentive seductiveness’ and she said that she thought that was very accurate,” he wrote….”

    Okay, you make the call…….which of the two is more professional and ethical?………Archdiocesan “investigative skills” or their “child protection skills”? Forget both items, where the hell is the LOGIC?

    In Philadelphia, our leadership uses the phrase “boundary violations” in place of your “inattentive seductiveness”. The rest of the US Catholic faithful understand such conduct as “sexual abuse”.

    Michael Skiendzielewski
    Captain (Retired)
    Philadelphia Police Dept

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